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NATIONAL SUPERMARKET ASSOCIATION LEADS WIC REFORM EFFORTS AT SOMOS CONFERENCE IN ALBANY

Independent Store Operators Call for Governor Cuomo to Reform WIC (see full article & more images)

Albany, New York – Hundreds of store operators, employees, and WIC recipients took part in the first-ever legislative panel focusing on WIC reforms held at this year’s 29th annual SOMOS El Futuro Conference in the State Capitol. 

The National Supermarket Association (NSA), which represents over 400 independent members in the New York metro area and Florida, has been leading the campaign so that WIC recipients do not have to travel miles for their specialty exempt baby formula. As it stands, the policy is that such formula can only be sold in supermarkets with pharmacies. In addition, the administration is attempting to reduce the number of locations where WIC cards can be used, which would create an increase burden on low-income New Yorkers.  

The panel - "The Impact of WIC Reforms on Neighborhood Stores" - was filled to capacity, even with participants standing. High-ranking elected officials were also present including Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr., NY Public Advocate Letitia ‘Tish’ James, State Senators Adriano Espaillat and Jose Peralta and Bronx Councilmember Ritchie Torres. Staff from Governor Cuomo’s office was also in attendance. 

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INNOVATIVE MOBILE COUPONING SERVICE IN 400 NEW YORK SUPERMARKETS


March 18, 2016

NEW TECHNOLOGY WILL REVOLUTIONIZE SHOPPING FOR SMALL BUSINESSES AND CONSUMERS ALIKE; 15% OF DCOUPON PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT COMMUNITY PROGRAMS VIA NSA CARES

The National Supermarket Association (NSA), representing the interests of independent supermarkets owners in New York and other U.S. urban cities, together with Scanbuy, Inc., the global leader in mobile marketing solutions, today announced the launching of dCoupon. The innovative mobile couponing service gives manufacturers the ability to create redeemable digital coupons for a whole new audience—the 2 million NSA urban supermarket consumers.  Mobile coupons will be obtained from brands and redeemed through consumers’ mobile devices at checkout counters in neighborhood bodegas, grocery stores and supermarkets.

dCoupon is a scalable mobile coupon management and redemption service designed to enable stores and brands of any size to embrace mobile couponing like never before.  Tagged by Scanbuy as a “disruptive technology,” dCoupon was created to address the best interests of brands, retailers and consumers. 

For the first time, any brand has the opportunity to create and distribute an unlimited number of coupon campaigns, select participating retailers and personalize mobile coupons. Most importantly, dCoupon enables brands to track attribution of coupons from distribution type to acquisition and redemption—while only paying for redeemed coupons.  This fundamental shift in today’s coupon ecosystem gives brands more control over spend and greater visibility into true return on investment of advertising campaigns.

NSA supermarkets will enjoy next day clearing, cost reduction on managing brand promotions and control over managing mobile coupon campaigns. In addition, dCoupon gives supermarkets the unprecedented ability to receive proceeds from coupon redemption fees.

Consumers gain access to mobile coupon savings for neighborhood supermarkets through QR Codes, URL links or retailer loyalty cards. Most notably, their participation provides an automatic contribution to valuable social programs in urban neighborhoods via pledged donations to NSA Cares.

“This is a historic agreement that will deliver immediate savings to our customers and expand technology to help our stores grow their business, while funding charitable efforts to serve different communities through NSA cares,” said National Supermarket Association President Rudy Fuertes. “The National Supermarket Association is thrilled to team with Scanbuy and we look forward to a great and long lasting partnership.”

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City policies are helping drive supermarkets under

February 11, 2016 — Source: CRAIN'S   Special programs are nice, but the government should rein in peddlers, lower food-store taxes and repeal a recently-passed law.

Jilly Stephens of City Harvest wrote a thought-provoking op-ed on the decline of supermarkets in New York City, noting that these stores “are the cornerstones of our communities, offering vital food while also lifting local economies, creating critical jobs and facilitating important social connections.”

Stephens recognized that the city needs to make the Fresh program stronger and to develop more effective incentives to not only promote new supermarkets in our neighborhoods, but to preserve our existing ones. She did, however, leave out a couple of major disincentives—city policies that inhibit the industry’s growth.

First, the city's ill-conceived Green Carts initiative has led to the proliferation of produce peddlers in so-called underserved areas. As we in the supermarket industry had predicted, these vendors set up shop right on the commercial strips where supermarkets, bodegas and green grocers were already providing fresh produce to these communities.

These Green Carts and their brethren in Manhattan—who are allowed to operate directly in front of our supermarkets—take anywhere from $5,000 to $6,000 a week from our registers, forcing us to let workers go and costing supervisory personnel their jobs, too. A city whose stated goal is to preserve supermarkets should not allow this kind of unfair competition.

Supermarkets are heavily taxed and regulated in the city. Produce peddlers are not. Our own stores are fully unionized and our workers have great wages and benefits. However, with the kind of overhead we operate with, it is impossible to compete with a peddler whose only expense aside from inventory is a $250 bi-yearly license fee.

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